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Riku Tanaka
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December 20 08:58

Finland opening up its online AI crash course to everyone

Initially intended only for residents of Finland, the government will be making the accessible for everyone.
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Towards the end of 2018, Finland created a free-to-use online class on the topic of AI with the goal of teaching its residents about the new tech. But in the holiday spirit, the country is making the multi-week program accessible for anyone that is willing to take advantage of the opportunity.
Finland’s officials said they initially planned the course to provide its residents a leg up in the AI tech sector. Finland has a strong reputation in both AI and training, so it seems reasonable to wed the two areas. Megan Schaible of the tech consultancy Reaktor, who helped plan the course, said the inspiration was “to prove that AI should not be left in the hands of a few elite coders.”
The move is technically a gift for the EU. Finland is passing on the its rotating presidency at the end of 2019, and chose to make a version of the class into several EU languages to benefit its residents. Be that as it may, there aren't any actual geographic limitations with respect to who can sign up, so in actuality it is globally available.
The lesson plan positively substantiated itself in Finland, with over 1% of the state’s 5.5 million residents taking part of the educational opportunity. The class, dubbed Elements of AI, is presently accessible in 5 languages, including English
Although it certainly isn’t the only class available in the world if you have an interest in AI, but the EU country’s educational giveaway is certainly appealing for anyone looking to get familiar with the nuts and bolts of the technology. It's pleasantly structured, gives quick assessments toward after every subject block, and isn’t limited to just the technical aspects, covering a breadth of subjects such as the philosophical ramifications of AI and specialized ones like Bayesian probability. It takes roughly 45 days to finish in its entirety, with each segment lasting somewhere between five to ten hours.